Kyoto


Kyoto is the main tourist destination of Japan. With 17 World Heratige Sites, there are many places worth a visit. We just visited a few of them.

Kinkaku-Ji

 

Kinkakuji (金閣寺, Golden Pavilion) is one of the most beautiful temples in Kyoto. It is a Zen temple in northern Kyoto whose top two floors are completely covered in gold leaf. Formally known as Rokuonji, the temple was the retirement villa of the shogun Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, and according to his will it became a Zen temple of the Rinzai sect after his death in 1408. Kinkakuji was the inspiration for the similarly named Ginkakuji (Silver Pavilion), built by Yoshimitsu’s grandson, Ashikaga Yoshimasa, on the other side of the city a few decades later.

Kinkakuji is an impressive structure built overlooking a large pond, and is the only building left of Yoshimitsu’s former retirement complex. It has burned down numerous times throughout its history including twice during the Onin War, a civil war that destroyed much of Kyoto; and once again more recently in 1950 when it was set on fire by a fanatic monk. The present structure was rebuilt in 1955.

Kinkaku-Ji can be reached by train, but there is a small parking space as well. We went there by car and there was enough space, but during high season it might be full.

Kiyomizu-dera Temple

Kiyomizudera (清水寺, literally “Pure Water Temple”) is one of the most celebrated temples of Japan. It was founded in 780 on the site of the Otowa Waterfall in the wooded hills east of Kyoto, and derives its name from the fall’s pure waters. The temple was originally associated with the Hosso sect, one of the oldest schools within Japanese Buddhism, but formed its own Kita Hosso sect in 1965. In 1994, the temple was added to the list of UNESCO world heritage sites.

Fushimi Inari-taisha

Fushimi Inari Shrine (伏見稲荷大社, Fushimi Inari Taisha) is an important Shinto shrine in southern Kyoto. It is famous for its thousands of vermilion torii gates, which straddle a network of trails behind its main buildings. The trails lead into the wooded forest of the sacred Mount Inari, which stands at 233 meters and belongs to the shrine grounds.

Fushimi Inari Taisha is well worth a visit, because it is totally different from most other temples in Kyoto. The orange gates stand out and give lots of opportunities to make photos. The temple can be reached by train, but you have to walk a little.

Nijō Castle

 

Arashiyama

 

Gion

 

Nishiki Market